Posts for: September, 2014

By Daniel Mashni, DDS & Associates, PLLC
September 24, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
MarthaStewartShowsOffRenovationWork-InHerMouth

Martha Stewart has built a flourishing career by showcasing the things she’s designed and made — like floral arrangements, crafts, and even home renovations. Just recently, she was showing off her latest restoration project: a new dental bridge. In fact, she live-tweeted the procedure from her dentist’s office… and she even included pictures of the bridgework before it was placed on her teeth!

OK, it’s a departure from paper crafts and home-made pillows… but why not? We can’t help feeling that there’s just as much craftsmanship — even artistry — in dental bridgework as there is in many other custom-made items. If you learn a little more about what goes into making and placing bridgework, perhaps you’ll understand why we feel that way.

Bridgework is one good solution to the problem of missing teeth (another is dental implants). A fixed bridge is anchored to existing teeth on either side of the gap left by missing teeth, and it uses those healthy teeth to support one or more lifelike replacement teeth. How does it work?

Fabricated as a single unit, the bridge consists of one or more crowns (caps) on either end that will be bonded or cemented to the existing teeth, plus a number of prosthetic teeth in the middle. The solid attachment of the crowns to the healthy teeth keeps the bridge in place; they support the artificial teeth in between, and let them function properly in the bite.

Here’s where some of the artistry comes in: Every piece of bridgework is custom-made for each individual patient. It matches not only their dental anatomy, but also the shape and shade of their natural teeth. Most bridges are made in dental laboratories from models of an individual’s teeth — but some dental offices have their own mini-labs, capable of fabricating quality bridgework quickly and accurately. No matter where they are made, lifelike and perfect-fitting bridges reflect the craftsmanship of skilled lab technicians using high-tech equipment.

Once it is made, bridgework must be properly placed on your teeth. That’s another job that requires a combination of art and science — and it’s one we’re experts at. From creating accurate models of your mouth to making sure the new bridge works well with your bite, we take pride in the work we do… and it shows in your smile.

If you would like more information about dental bridges, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Fixed vs. Removable Bridges” and “Dental Implants vs. Bridgework.”


By Daniel Mashni, DDS & Associates, PLLC
September 09, 2014
Category: Oral Health
ExtendtheLifeofYourDentalApplianceWithProperCare

Your dental appliance plays a big role in restoring function and improving your appearance. Taking proper care of it will ensure it can do that for a long time.

Cleaning is a top priority. Though it might seem natural to use toothpaste, you should avoid using it on your appliance. The abrasives in toothpaste are necessary to break up plaque on natural teeth’s hard enamel surfaces, but will leave micro scratches on the surface of your appliance that eventually become havens for bacterial growth — a sure recipe for discoloration and unpleasant odors. If you plan to use boiling or hot water to disinfect your appliance, don’t. The heat distorts the plastic and can disrupt its precise mouth fit. You should also avoid using bleach because it can break down the composition of the plastic, can leave a strong odor, and can whiten the pink “gum tissue” areas of the denture.

Instead, use plain liquid detergent or hand soap with warm water to clean your appliance — and use a brush designed for it rather than your toothbrush. If you have a long-term appliance like a denture, you might consider investing in an ultra-sonic cleaner that uses high frequency sound vibrations to clean out small crevices a brush can’t reach.

Remember the old saying, “familiarity breeds contempt?” With dental appliances, too much time in the mouth breeds bacteria. Dentures, for example, should be taken out at night to allow saliva and its antibacterial capacity to work in your mouth. You also should be on the lookout for signs of infection — if anything appears amiss, contact us for an exam as soon as possible to minimize the effects of tooth decay or gum disease.

One final item: be careful where you place your appliance when it’s not in your mouth. Lying out in the open (like on a nightstand) is a tempting lure for the family pet or a curious child. Keep it in its case in accordance with the care instructions given you when you received your appliance.

Doing the right things — and avoiding the wrong things — when caring for your dental appliance will go a long way to increasing its life and reducing problems along the way.

If you would like more information on caring for your oral appliance, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.